The Zanetti Hesiod: A Perfect Copy in Contemporary Pigskin by Konrad Küne

Hesiod (fl. CA. 700 B.C.)

Works, in Greek. Hesiodi Ascraei Opera et Dies. Theogonia. Scutum Herculis. Omnia cu[m] multis optimisque expositionibus. Hesiodi Ascraei Opera et Dies. Theogonia. Scutum Herculis. Omnia cu[m] multis optimisque expositionibus.

Venice: Bartolomeo Zanetti, for Joannes Franciscus Trincavellius, 1537

$15,000.00

Quarto: 20.8 x 15 cm. [4], 188 leaves. +4, [alpha]-[psi]8, [omega]4

“This edition is valuable on account of its excellent scholia and correct Greek text which have formed the basis of almost every subsequent edition…A truly valuable, if not indispensable, volume in a library of any classical pretension.” –Dibdin II, 31

Bound in a beautiful contemporary binding of alum-tawed pigskin over beveled wooden boards, attributed to Konrad Küne of Stuttgart. The binding is in near-perfect condition with intact clasps and catches. The binding is elaborately tooled in blind with rolls of the Evangelists and Graces. Internally, this copy is in extraordinary condition with bright leaves and generous margins. There is a small spot of ink on the first leaf, strategically placed to cover the genitals of the woodcut putto.

First and sole Zanetti edition, an edition famous for its typographic beauty. This edition is of central importance, as it contains the first printing of the Greek scholia, and formed the basis of virtually all subsequent editions. Dibdin says that "this is a truly valuable, if not indispensable, volume in a library of any classical pretension." This edition includes all of the works ascribed to Hesiod: the "Works and Days", the "Theogony" and the "Shield of Herakles". The text of the poems is accompanied by exegesis in Greek by John Tzetzes (fl. 12th c.) and Manuel Moschopoulos (fl. late 13th c.).

Leaf I features a headpiece, two initials and text headings printed in red. The full-page woodcut depicts agricultural implements and occupations; there are two other diagrams in the text, and the printer's pictorial device on the title is a variant of his standard putto, which has been ascribed to Titian. "Bonne edition; elle est recherchee, mais point fort rare: les scolies en font le principal merite" - Brunet.

Mortimer 233. Brunet III:140. Sander 3380; Adams H-470; Hoffmann II, 248; Bibliotheca Bacchica 345; Layton, pp. 33, 513-21; Schweiger I, 143; Graesse III, 262; STC Italian, p. 326.