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Stanley’s Aeschylus

Aeschylus (525/4-456 B.C.); Stanley, Thomas (1625-1678), editor.
[Title in Greek], Aeschyli traoediae septem: cum scholiis Græcis omnibus; deperditorum dramatum fragmentis, versione & commentario Thomæ Stanleii.

London: Typis Jacobi Flesher: prostant verò apud Cornelium Bee, M DC LXIII. 1663

Folio: 31.8 x 20.1 cm [32], 886 p. Collation: (a)2, (b)-(g)2, A-Z2, 2A-9Z2, 10A-10P2

$6,000.00

In his “Early Printed Editions of Aeschylus (1518-1664)”, J.A. Gruys gives a detailed account of Stanley’s working method, beginning with an examination of the extant manuscript materials, and vindicates Stanley from Fraenkel’s charges that Stanley’s edition relied too heavily on the work of the scholar John Pearson and that Stanley himself was a scholar of much meaner abilities.

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Wing A684

“A collection of the flowers of antiquities and histories” for the Elizabethan Reader

Allott, Robert (active 1600); Bodenham, John (active 1600)
Wits Theater of The Little World

London: Iames Roberts for Nicholas Ling, 1599

Octavo: 12.4 x 7.8 cm. [iv], 269, [7] lvs. Collation: A4, B-2M8, 2N4

$18,000.00

“Wits Theater” was produced as part of a publishing project conceived by John Bodenham. The “series” began with Nicholas Ling’s “Politeuphuia: Wits Commonwealth” in 1597, and also included the poetic miscellany “Englands Parnassus” of 1600.

“Wits Theater”

Like the later “Englands Parnassus”, “Wits Theater” was compiled by Robert Allott and may be regarded as the prose equivalent of the poetical “Parnassus”.

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STC 382; ESTC S100300; Grolier, Langland to Wither 15; Pforzheimer 1094; Hoe catalog I: 59

Canadian Native Americans as victims & perpetrators of violence

AMERICAS. CANADA. Bressani, Francesco Giuseppe (1612-1672)
Breve Relatione d’Alcune Missioni de’ PP. della Compagnia di Giesù nella Nuova Francia.

Macerata: Heirs of Agostino Grisei, 1653

Quarto: 21.5 x 15.5 cm. [4], 8 pp., 9-10 ll., 11-127, [1] pp. Collation: π2 A4 B4 (±B1.2) C-Q4

$15,000.00

FIRST EDITION of one of the most important eyewitness accounts of 17th-century Canada devoted primarily to the Huron Indians, but also with accounts of other groups, including the Jesuit author’s captivity and mutilation under the Iroquois. He also devotes 25 pages to a 1643 letter written by his Jesuit colleague Isaac Jogues (1607-1646), who was killed by the Mohawks.

Bressani (1612-1672), an Italian Jesuit, travelled to Canada as a missionary in 1642.

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Alden & Landis 653/15; De Backer & Sommervogel II, col. 133; Walter, Jesuit relations, 43; Church 524; James Ford Bell Lib. B-407; JCB II, p. 428; Lande, Canadiana 57; McCoy, Jesuit relations 82; Sabin 7734; not in Eberstadt; Streeter.

One of the First Books Devoted to Library Science, From the library of Joachim Gomez de la Cortina

Araoz, Francisco de (fl. 1st half of the 17th c.)
De bene disponenda bibliotheca, ad meliorem cognitionem loci & materiae, qualitatisque librorum, litteratis perutile opusculum.

Madrid: Francisco Martinez, 1631

Octavo: 14.6 x 9.2 cm. (24), 57, (11) leaves. Collation: ¶-¶¶¶8, A-H8, I4. With an engraved frontispiece (leaf ¶2)

$9,500.00

The treatise explains how to organize a library, with references to an ideal library, to the author’s personal library, and to that of the most important Spanish bibliophile of the Siglo de oro, Lorenzo Ramírez de Prado. The work is divided into fifteen chapters, each with subdivisions arranged according to topic. These categories include religious and secular (including comic) poetry, dictionaries, books of commonplaces, rhetoric, secular history (including fictional works), mathematics, natural philosophy, moral philosophy, medicine, emblems, politics, law, etc.

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OCLC, 928209128; Iberian Books, II, A.S. Wilkinson & A. Ulla Lorenzo, no. 21213.

“The indispensable link between the earlier Tudor writers and the great Elizabethan and Jacobean writers of English prose” (Ryan, 292). One of the most important literary works of the English Renaissance

Ascham, Roger (1515-1568)
The Schoolemaster. Or, Playne and perfiteway of teaching Children, to understande, write, and speake the Latin toong, but specially purposed for the priuate bringing up of youth in Ientlemen and Noblemens houses: And commodious also for all such as haue forgot the Latin toong, and would, by themselues, without a Schoolemaister, in short time, and with small paines, recouer a sufficient habilitie, to vnderstand, write, and speake Latine. By Roger Ascham.

London: Printed by Abell Ieffes, 1589

Quarto: 18.8 x 13.3 cm [6] 64 lvs. Collation: A2, B-S4

$12,000.00

“Between 1563 and the date of his death Ascham found some relief from his cares in the composition of his “Scholemaster”. In 1563, the year of the plague, Ascham dined at Windsor with Sir William Cecil, and among the guests were William Sackville, and his friends Haddon and Astley. After dinner Ascham was informed that certain scholars had run away from Eton for fear of a flogging, and the conversation turned on educational discipline, in which Ascham strongly condemned corporal punishment.

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STC 836; Langland to Wither #7; Pforzheimer #16; The printer's device on the final leaf is McKerrow #253; Arber II. 788; Huntington C.L., II; Sinker T.C.C. Cat. No. 672; R.W. Gibson, St. Thomas More: A Preliminary Bibliography of his Works and of Moreana to the Year 1750

Archery, “an Imitation of most Ernest Things to be done in Manhood.” A Work of Great Importance for the Development of English Prose in the Age of Latin

Ascham, Roger (1514/15-1568)
Toxophilus: The Schoole, or partitions of Shooting contayned in two bookes . now newly perused . Pleasaunt for all Gentlemen and Yomen of England for their pastime to reade, and profitable for their use to follow both in warre and peace.

London: Published by Printed by Abell Ieffes by the consent of H. Marsh, 1589

Quarto: 19 x 13.5 cm. [vi], 63, [1] ff. Collation: ¶¶4, ¶¶¶2, A-H8 ff.

$15,000.00

The Cambridge-educated Ascham, one of the best known of the English humanists, produced two works that had a great influence on the use of English as a literary language as well as on the education of children and the conduct of English gentlemen. The first of these was his “Toxophilus” (1545), dedicated to Henry VIII, in which he set forth both the dictum that physical exercise is an indispensable part of a gentleman’s education, and set a new model for English prose style.

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ESTC S100281; Cockle 9; Pforzheimer 18

First Edition of William Watts’ translation of The First Great Autobiography

Augustine, Saint, Bishop of Hippo (354-430 AD); Watts, William (1590?-1649), translator
Saint Augustines confessions translated: and with some marginall notes illustrated. Wherein, diuers antiquities are explayned; and the marginall notes of a former Popish translation, answered. By William Watts, rector of St. Albanes, Woodstreete.

London: printed by Iohn Norton, for Iohn Partridge: and are to be sold at the signe of the Sunne in Pauls Church-yard, 1631

Duodecimo: 14 x 8.1 cm. [12], 1012, [8] p., [1] With an added engraved title page. Collation: A B-2V 2X

$4,500.00

First edition of William Watts’ translation, written in part as a response to the “popish” translation of Sir Tobie Matthew (1577-1655) printed at the English College press of St. Omer in 1620. Watts began his translation as a Lenten devotion, but, he tells us, “I quickly found it to exercise more than my devotion: it exercised my skill (all I had): it exercised my patience, it exercised my friends too, for ‘tis incomparably the hardest taske that ever I undertooke.

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STC 912

The Monuments of Ancient Rome Engraved by Piranesi’s Collaborator & Rival

Barbault, Jean (1718-1762)
Les Plus Beaux Monuments De Rome Ancienne. Ou Recueíl Des Plus Beaux Morceaux de L'Antiquité Romaine Qui Existent Encore: Dessinés Par Monsieur Barbault Peintre Ancien Pensionnaire Du Roy a Rome, Et Gravés, en 128 Planches Avec Leur Explication.

Rome: Chez Bouchard et Gravier Libraires François rüe du Cours près de Saint Marcel, de l 1761

Large Folio: 51 x 35.5 cm. VIII, 90 pp. Collation: [π]1, [a]-[c]1, A-Z, Aa-Yy1. With 73 added plates. Complete.

$16,000.00

The French artist Jean Barbault arrived in Rome in 1747 and quickly became involved with the circle of Piranesi, with whom he worked on the “Varie Vedute di Roma Antica e Moderna” and for whose “Antichità Romane” he contributed figures for 14 plates “thus becoming one of the few official collaborators” of Piranesi. Barbault’s own views appeared 7 years after his collaboration with Piranesi.

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La Cicognara 3593; Fowler 37; Millard IV, no. 13; RIBA, Early Printed Books, 184

An Irish Woman Poet’s First Published Collection of Poems. With additional Poems by Constantia Grierson and Elizabeth Rowe

Barber, Mary (ca. 1685-1755); Grierson, Constantia (1704/5-1732); Rowe, Elizabeth (1674-1737)
Poems on Several Occasions.

London: Printed [by Samuel Richardson] for C. Rivington, at the Bible and Crown in St. Paul’s Church-Yard. 1734

Octavo: 20 x 12.5 cm. xliv, 290, (14) pp. A8, b-d8, B-U8

$3,500.00

In addition to Mary Barber’s own poems, this volume includes the first appearance of six poems by another Irish woman poet, Constantia Grierson, another member of Swift’s “triumfeminate”, and one poem by Elizabeth Rowe.

Mary Barber (ca. 1690-1757) was the wife of a Dublin tailor. In 1724 she wrote a poem to solicit charity for an officer's widow left penniless with a blind child, and sent it to Thomas Tickell, with the request that it be brought to the attention of Lord Carteret, then Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.

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Foxon p. 45; ESTC T42623; Maslen, Samuel Richardson, 21

The extremely Rare First Edition of Barbo on Aristotle’s Metaphysics. In a Spanish(?) Binding

Barbo, Paolo, da Soncino [Paulus Soncinas]
Quaestiones in libros metaphysicae Aristotelis

Venice: Simon Bevilaqua, 28 September 1498

Folio: 30.3 x 20.5 cm. (204) ff.

$9,000.00

Paolo Barbò da Soncino [in Latin, Paulus Socinas] was an Italian Thomist philosopher and Doctor of Theology. He taught philosophy at Milan, and then at Ferrara, Siena, and Bologna. His life and work fall within the ambit of Italian Renaissance Thomism of the fifteenth century (He edited Aquinas’ “Opuscula” in 1488.) Among his masters were probably Peter Maldura of Bergamo (d.

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GW M30270. ISTC ip00208000. Goff P-208. Not in BMC

Behn’s Only Original Volume of Verse

Behn, Aphra (1640-89)
Poems upon Several Occasions with a Voyage to the Island of Love. By Mrs. A. Behn.

London: Printed by R. Tonson and J. Tonson, at Gray 1684

Octavo: 17.6 x 11.5 cm. A8, (b)8, B-K8, L1; B-I8 (L1 bound last)

$18,000.00

The poems of the celebrated Aphra Behn, with nine prefatory poems in praise of Behn and her writings, including one by Thomas Creech and an anonymous poem sometimes attributed to Dryden. Aphra Behn, best known for her contributions to Restoration drama, was the first professional woman writer to produce a substantial body of work in English. “In her own period Behn was held to be a considerable author, famous as a playwright, propagandist poet and panegyrist, novelist, and translator (Janet Todd, ODNB)

“Through her literary life she was writing verses, though these were published in her own volumes primarily in the mid 1680s when she clearly needed money from projects outside the theatre.

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O’Donnell “Aphra Behn, an Annotated Bibliography of Primary and Secondary Sources” A18.1a; Wing B1757; Term Catalog 2, 73 (Easter 1684) Case “A Bibliography of English Poetical Miscellanies” 1521-1750), 184b

With Verses by Aphra Behn. A Fantastic, Large-Paper Copy

Behn, Aphra (1640-89); Aesop (ca. 620-564 B.C.); Barlow, Francis (1626?-1702)
Aesop’s fables with his life: in English, French and Latin. Newly translated. Illustrated with one hundred and twelve sculptures. To this edition are likewise added, thirty one new figures representing his life. By Francis Barlow.

London: Printed by H. Hills jun. for Francis Barlow, and are to be sold by Chr. Wilkinson at the Black-boy against St. Dunstan’s Church in Fleet-street, Tho. Fox in Westminster-hall, and Henry Faithorne at the Rose in St. Paul’s Church-yard, 1687

Folio: 36.3 x 22.8 cm. [8], 40; 40; 17, 2-221, [3] p. COLLATION: π1(printed title), a2, B-L2; B-L2, B-Z2, Aa-Zz2, Aaa-Ppp2.

$28,000.00

For this second edition of his magnificent production, Barlow commissioned Aphra Behn, then at the height of her popularity as a playwright and poet, to write verses to be engraved on the 110 plates illustrating the fables. In order to substitute Behn’s verses for those of Thomas Philipot (d. 1682), the lower area of the plate needed to be burnished down and the new verses engraved onto the plate in place of the earlier ones.

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Wing (CD-ROM, 1996), A703

The Natural World & The Human Soul

Berenger of Landorra, Archbishop of Santiago de Compostela (circa 1262-1330), and Gregory of Vorau (ed. Matthias Farinator)
Lumen Animae. Incipit: Liber moralitatum elegantissimus magnarum reru[m] naturalium lumen anime dict[us]: cu[m] septe[m] apparitorib[us] necno[n] sanctoru[m] doctoru[m] orthodoxe fidei p[ro]fessorum Poetaru[m] etia[m] ac oratoru[m] auctoritatib[us] p[er] modum pharatre s[e]c[un]d[u]m ordine[m] alphabeti collectis feliciter incipit.

Strasbourg: Printer of the 1481 Legenda aurea, 22 March 1482

Folio: 29.2 x 21.8 cm. 274 unsigned leaves. [A-C]8, [D]10; [a-m]8, [n]6,[o-z]8, [aa-ff]8, [gg]10. Complete with the initial and final blanks.

$45,000.00

The arrival of printed books is so often regarded as one of the inaugural moments of the renaissance that it is sometimes forgotten that the first years of print also represented the last great flowering of the Middle Ages. The “Lumen Anime” (Light of the Soul), is testament to that. Formerly attributed to the Carmelite friar Mathias Farinator of Vienna (who compiled the index), the “Lumen Anime” is now known to be Berenger of Landorra, General of the Dominican order and archbishop of Campostella from 1317 to 1325.

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BMC I, 97; Hain-Copinger 10333*; Goff L-396; Proctor 413; Polain 1468; Wellcome I, 2175; Klebs 631.3; Thorndyke III, 546ff. Sources: Mary A. and Richard H. Rouse, ‘The Texts called Lumen Anime,’ Archivum Fratrum Praedicatorum, 41 (Rome, 1971), 5-113; N.R. Ker, Records of All Soul’s College Library. 1437-1600 (Oxford, 1971), 27.

Rome & The Papal States. The Very Rare “Theatrum Italiae”. With 118 Folding & Full page Engraved Illustrations

Blaeu, Joan (1596-1673)
Theatrvm civitatvm et admirandorvm Italiae / ad aevi veteris & praesentis temporis faciem expressum a Ioanne Blaeu, G.F.

Amsterdam: Typis Joannis Blaeu, 1663

Two Large Folio Volumes: 56 x 38 cm. Vol I: 2 ff. (General printed title conjugate with dedication), 2 ff. ("Ad lectorem"), 1 f. (Dedication), 2 ff. (Printed section title, half title), 1-253 pp., 1 f. (Index leaf). Illustrated with an engraved frontispiece and 74 plates.

$75,000.00

A fine set of one of Joan Blaeu’s most magnificent productions. This set is very rare, owing probably to the fire that ravaged Blaeu’s workshop in 1672, the year before the publication of these “town books”. This copy has an additional plate, not recorded by Koeman, of the Obeliscus Pamphilius, in volume 2.

The two volumes are profusely illustrated with town views, architectural plans, ancient, Renaissance, and Baroque architecture (including many villas); and sculpture.

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Koeman, C. Atlantes Neerlandici; Bl 72.; Koeman, C. Atlantes Neerlandici; Bl 73; Philippsa, 4039; Cremonini, 39

The Cornerstone of Prison Literature. The Heber-Britwell copy

Boethius, Anicius Manlius Severinus (480-525 A.D.); Coleville, George, translator (fl. 1556)
Boetius de Consolationae [sic] Philosophiæ. The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome, moche necessary for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of th lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges, ... Translated out of Latin into the Englyshe toungue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynte

London: In Paules churche yarde at the sygne of the holy Ghost, by Ihon Cawoode, prynter to the Kynge and Quenes Maiesties, 1556

Quarto: 20 x 14 cm. [A]4, B-Z4, Aa-Ff4 (blank Ff4 lacking)

$30,000.00

Dedicated to Queen Mary Tudor, Coleville’s English translation of Boethius’ masterpiece is the only early English translation to include the original Latin text, indicating that, in addition to those readers with no knowledge of Latin, the author took into consideration the more educated, Latin-literate English audience. Coleville provides interesting marginal glosses and explanatory notes, including the tale of the sword of Damocles.

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STC 3201

“Nudi, Recti, Venusti” -Cicero

Caesar, Gaius Iulius (100-44 B.C.)
C. Iulii Caesaris Rerum ab se gestarum commentarii. De bello Gallico libri VIII. De bello civili Pompeiano libri III. De bello Alexandrino liber I. De bello Africo liber I. De bello Hispaniensi liber I. Ex vetustiss. scriptis codicibus emendatiores. [Bound with:] Eutropius: Epitome belli Gallici ex Suetonii Tranqulli monumentis.

Paris: ex officina Rob. Stephani, 1544

Octavo: 17 x 11 cm. (32), 523, (1, blank), (108) pp. Collation: I. *8, **8 (**4 and 5 are conjugates that form the folded map of Spain), a-z8, A-Q8, R4. II. 134, (16) pp. Collation: A-I8, K4

$4,500.00

This edition of Caesar includes the texts of the “Gallic Wars” and “Civil War”, together with the "De bello Alexandrino", "De bello Africano", and "De bello Hispaniense", ascribed to Aulus Hirtius. This edition also includes Raimundo Marliano’s useful index of the topography of Gaul in Roman times.

Admired for their style (most famously by Cicero) and read by both his supporters and detractors alike in antiquity, Caesar’s Commentarii fell into obscurity in the Middle Ages.

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Schreiber, The Estiennes, no. 72 and 73; Renouard 61.15; Adams C-38 and E 1133

First Edition in English of Calvin’s Sermons on Timothy and Titus

Calvin, Jean (1509-1564)
Sermons of M. Iohn Caluin, on the Epistles of S. Paule to Timothie and Titus. Translated out of French into English, by L.T.

London: Imprinted [by Henry Middleton] for G. Bishop and T. Woodcoke, 1579

Quarto: 22.5 x 15.8 cm. [48], 1248 pp. Collation: [par.]-3[par.] (with blank leaf 3[par.]8); A-Z8, Aa-Zz8, Aaa-Zzz8, Aaaa-Iiii8

$7,500.00

"Most prominent among the means Calvin used to reform the city (Geneva) was preaching. Every other week he preached every day in plain, direct, convincing fashion, without eloquence, but still irresistibly; and the life that the preacher led constituted his strongest claim to attention. The reports of his sermons are probably form notes made by his hearers; which was the easier done, because, being asthmatic, he spoke very slowly.

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STC (2nd ed.), 4441

Two English Translations of Calvin’s Sermons

Calvin, Jean (1509-1564)
Sermons of M. Iohn Caluin, vpon the x. Commandements of the Lawe, giuen of God by Moses, otherwise called the Decalogue. Gathered worde for worde, presently at his sermons, when hee preached on Deuteronomie, without adding vnto, or diminishing from them any thing afterward. Translated out of French into English, by I.H.

London: Thomas Dawson for George Byshop, 1581

Quarto: 2 works bound as one. I. [4], 125, [1] lvs. Collation: *4 A-Hh4 Ii2. II. [6], 203, [1] lvs. Collation: *4 **2 A4 B-Cc8 (final leaf blank)

$8,500.00

[Bound with:]

Diuers sermons of Master Iohn Caluin, concerning the diuinitie, humanitie, and natiuitie of our Lorde Iesus Christe: as also touching his passion, death, resurrection, ascention: togeather with the comming downe of the holy Ghoste vpon his Apostles: and the first sermon of S. Peter. The order of which you shall finde in the page ensuing.

London: Printed [by Thomas Dawson] for George Byshop, 1581

I.

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I. ESTC S109598; STC (2nd ed.), 4455. II. ESTC S107259; STC (2nd ed.), 4437

“An ill cook cannot lick his own fingers”. Proverbs, Sir Thomas More’s most memorable witticisms, & The Lord’s Prayer in Anglo Saxon

Camden, William (1551-1623)
Remaines Concerning Britaine: Their Languages. Names. Surnames. Allusions. Anagrammes. Armories. Monies. Empreses. Apparell. Artillarie. Wise Speeches. Proverbs. Poesies. Epitaphes. Written by William Camden Esquire, Glarenceux, King of Armes, Surnamed the Learned. The fift Impression, with many rare Antiquities never before imprinted. By the industry and care of Iohn Philipot, Somerset Herald.

London: Thomas Harper for John Waterson, 1637

Quarto: 17.8 x 13.5 cm. A-Z4, Aa-Zz4, Aaa-Hhh4 (complete with the final blank Hhh4)

$3,500.00

The rude rubble and outcast rubbish of a more serious work." Thus Camden, in his introduction, describes the present work. Despite these remarks, the "Remaines" is full of curious riches. This collection of genealogical, historical, and linguistic material proved immensely popular, going through seven editions in the seventeenth century. Camden originally collected this information for inclusion in an edition of his "Britannia" that never materialized.

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STC 4526; The English Emblem Tradition, Vol. 4, Edited by Peter M. Daly and Mary V. Silcox (1999)

“An ill cook cannot lick his own fingers”. Proverbs, Sir Thomas More’s most memorable witticisms, & The Lord’s Prayer in Anglo Saxon

Camden, William (1551-1623)
Remaines Concerning Britaine: Their Languages. Names. Surnames. Allusions. Anagrammes. Armories. Monies. Empreses. Apparell. Artillarie. Wise Speeches. Proverbs. Poesies. Epitaphes. Written by William Camden Esquire, Glarenceux, King of Armes, Surnamed the Learned. The fift Impression, with many rare Antiquities never before imprinted. By the industry and care of Iohn Philipot, Somerset Herald.

London: Thomas Harper for John Waterson, 1637

Quarto: 18.2 x 13.5 cm A-Z4, Aa-Zz4, Aaa-Hhh4 (lacking final blank Hhh4)

$3,500.00

The rude rubble and outcast rubbish of a more serious work." Thus Camden, in his introduction, describes the present work. Despite these remarks, the "Remaines" is full of curious riches. This collection of genealogical, historical, and linguistic material proved immensely popular, going through seven editions in the seventeenth century. Camden originally collected this information for inclusion in an edition of his "Britannia" that never materialized.

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STC 4526; The English Emblem Tradition, Vol. 4, Edited by Peter M. Daly and Mary V. Silcox (1999)

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