England 1482 - 1782

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A Miniature Georgian Almanac in a Contemporary Binding with Original Metal Stylus

ALMANAC. MINIATURE BOOKS. Goldsmith, John, active 17th century
Goldsmith. An almanack for the year of Lord God, M.DCC.LXXXII. Being the second after bissextile or leap-year. Wherein are contain’d necessary rules, and useful tables; with a new chronology of remarkable events; also, the proper days and hours for transfering stocks and receiving dividends; and a list of holidays kept at the public offices, &c. Calculated by John Goldsmith.

London: Printed for the Company of Stationers, and sold by John Wilkie, at their Hall Ludgate-Street, 1782

$2,800.00

Duodecimo: 10.5 x 5.5 cm. 8 p. A-B12

A truly lovely copy of one of the miniature almanacs published by the Company of Stationers. Rare. ESTC records only 1 copy of this edition (at the British Library).

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ESTC T35691

“The indispensable link between the earlier Tudor writers and the great Elizabethan and Jacobean writers of English prose” (Ryan, 292) - Printed by John Day

Ascham, Roger (1514/15-1568)
The Scholemaster or plaine and perfite way of teaching children, to vnderstand, write, and speake, the Latin tong, but specially purposed for the priuate bringing vp of youth in Ientlemen and Noble mens houses, and commodious also for all such, as haue forgot the Latin tonge, and would, by them selves, without a Scholemaster, in short time, and with small paines, recover a sufficient habilitie, to understand, write, and speake Latin. By Roger Ascham. An. 1571.

London: Printed by Iohn Daye, dwelling ouer Aldersgate, 1571

$15,000.00

Quarto: 18.4 x 14 cm. [manicule]2, B-T4

 “The Scholemaster”, Ascham’s Masterpiece:

The Cambridge-educated Ascham, one of the best known of the English humanists, produced two works that had a great influence on the use of English as a literary language as well as on the education of children and the conduct of English gentlemen.

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STC 834; cf. PMM 90

Two of the most important literary works of the English Renaissance, Together with Ascham’s Essay on Historiography - With Manuscript waste from a 15th c. Breviary with several lines in Middle English

Ascham, Roger (1514/15-1568)
The Scholemaster or plaine and perfite way of teaching children, to vnderstand, write, and speake, the Latin tong, but specially purposed for the priuate bringing vp of youth in Ientlemen and Noble mens houses b/w Toxophilus, the schole, or partitions of shooting b/w A Report and Discourse written by Roger Ascham of the affaires and state of Germany and the Emperour Charles his court, duryng certaine yeares while the said Roger was there.

London: Printed by Iohn Daye, dwelling ouer Aldersgate, [1571], London: In Fletestreate neare to Saint Dunstones Churche by Thomas Marshe, 1571, London, Printed by Iohn Daye, dwelling ouer Aldersgate, ca. 1570

$45,000.00

Quarto: Three volumes bound as one: 19.5 x 14.2 cm. I. [manicule]2, B-T4. II. *4, A-H8, III. A-I4

I. “The Schoolmaster”:

“The indispensable link between the earlier Tudor writers and the great Elizabethan and Jacobean writers of English prose”(Ryan, 292)

The Cambridge-educated Ascham, one of the best known of the English humanists, produced two works that had a great influence on the use of English as a literary language as well as on the education of children and the conduct of English gentlemen.

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ISTC S100261, S100277, S100282; STC 834, 838, 830

The City of God

Augustine, Saint, of Hippo (354-430 AD); Vives, Juan Luis (1492-1540); Healy, John [translator] (d. 1610)
Saint Augustine, Of the citie of God : with the learned comments of Io. Lodouicus Viues. Englished first by J. H. and now in this second edition compared with the Latine originall, and in very many places corrected and amended.

London: Printed by G. Eld and M. Flesher, 1620

$8,500.00

Folio: 32.3 x 21.5 cm. ¶4, A-Z6, Aa-Zz6, Aaa-Zzz6, Aaaa-Dddd6 (lacks blank ¶1).

This second edition was revised by William Crashaw (1572-1626), father of the poet Richard Crashaw, and includes the commentary of Juan Luis Vives (first published in Basle, 1522), which Vives wrote at the suggestion of Erasmus.

"Fifteen years after Augustine wrote the Confessions, at a time when he was bringing to a close (and invoking government power to do so) his long struggle with the Donatists but before he had worked himself up to action against the Pelagians, the Roman world was shaken by news of a military action in Italy.

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STC 917; Estelrich 119. Pforzheimer 19

The Cornerstone of Prison Literature. The Heber-Britwell copy

Boethius, Anicius Manlius Severinus (480-525 A.D.); Coleville, George, translator (fl. 1556)
Boetius de Consolationae [sic] Philosophiæ. The boke of Boecius, called the comforte of philosophye, or wysedome, moche necessary for all men to read and know, wherein suche as be in aduersitie, shall fynde muche consolation and comforte, and suche as be in great worldly prosperitie may knowe the vanitie and frailtie therof, and consequently fynde eternall felycytie. And this boke is in maner of a dialoge or communication betwene two persones, the one is Boecius, and the other is Philosophy, whose disputations and argumentes do playnly declare the diuersitie of th lyfe actiue, that consisteth in worldly, temporall, and transitory thynges, ... Translated out of Latin into the Englyshe toungue by George Coluile, alias Coldewel, to thintent that such as be ignoraunt in the Latin tongue, and can rede Englyshe, maye vnderstande the same. And to the mergentes is added the Latin, accordynge to the boke of the translatour, whiche was a very olde prynte

London: In Paules churche yarde at the sygne of the holy Ghost, by Ihon Cawoode, prynter to the Kynge and Quenes Maiesties, 1556

$30,000.00

Quarto: 20 x 14 cm. [A]4, B-Z4, Aa-Ff4 (blank Ff4 lacking)

Dedicated to Queen Mary Tudor, Coleville’s English translation of Boethius’ masterpiece is the only early English translation to include the original Latin text, indicating that, in addition to those readers with no knowledge of Latin, the author took into consideration the more educated, Latin-literate English audience. Coleville provides interesting marginal glosses and explanatory notes, including the tale of the sword of Damocles.

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STC 3201

Boyle's Law

Boyle, Robert (1627-91)
New Experiments Physico-Mechanical, touching the Spring of the Air, and its effects, made, for the most part, in a new pneumatical engine… London: Printed by Miles Flesher for Richard Davis, Bookseller in Oxford, 1682. [bound with] [2] A Continuation of New Experiments Physico-Mechanical, Touching the Spring and Weight of the Air, and their effects. The I. Part. Oxford: Printed by Henry Hall…for Richard Davis, 1669. [bound with] [3] A Continuation of New Experiments Physico-Mechanical, Touching the Spring and Weight of the Air, and their effects. The second part.

London: Printed by Miles Flesher for Richard Davis, 1682

$15,000.00

Quarto: 19.5 x 16 cm. 3 works in 2 volumes (the two continuations bound first): 1st Vol. "Continuation… the I. Part"(1669) and "Continuation… the second part"(1682). Collations: *4, **4, A2, B-Z4, Aa-Dd4, Ee2. With 8 engraved plates after p. 198; A4, a4, b2, B-Z4, Aa-Cc4, Dd2. With 5 plates bound after p. 198. 2nd Vol. "New Experiments"(1682) in 3 parts. Collation: A4, a4, B-Z4, Aa-Tt4, Vv4 (-Vv4), a-o4. With 2 engraved plates. The last part is bound first.

THIRD EDITION of Boyle’s book on his original experiments on air, his first scientific work and the one on which his fame rests. This edition, like the second, includes his controversial tracts against Linus and Hobbes, the former provoking an attack to which Boyle wrote a defence that contained “Boyle’s law”, first published in the second edition and present here.

[2] FIRST EDITION.

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Wing B4000, B3934, B3935. Fulton 15, 16, 18. See Horblit 15, PMM 143, and the Norman catalogue 300 for the second edition. Neville I, p. 192, has the same combination of works as are present here.

The Sole Edition of Brathwait’s Satire on the Vices of Women

Brathwait, Richard (1588?-1673)
Ar’t asleepe husband? A boulster lecture; stored with all variety of witty jeasts, merry tales, and other pleasant passages; extracted, from the choicest flowers of philosophy, poesy, antient and moderne history. Illustrated with examples of incomparable constancy, in the excellent history of Philocles and Doriclea. By Philogenes Panedonius

London: Printed by R. Bishop, for R[ichard]. B[est]. or his assignes, 1640

$9,600.00

17 x 11 cm. [48], 318, [8] p., [1] leaf of plates Collation: [A]1, a-c⁸, B-X⁸ (with blank X8), Y⁴

This copy conforms with Pforzheimer and lacks the bifolium “Postscript” (Z1-2) “Apparently supplementary and frequently wanting”(Grolier). It is found only in the Huntington and Harmsworth (Folger) copies in the U.S. Quire Y contains the poems "Menippus his Madrigall, to his coy-duck Clarabel” and “Loves Festivall at Lusts Funerall”.

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STC 3555; Pforzheimer, 76; Grolier, Wither to Prior 86

Bunyan’s Evolving Doctrine of Justification & An Attack on the Church of England - The First Edition - Complete With the Engraved frontispiece

Bunyan, John (1628-1688)
A discourse upon the Pharisee and the publicane. Wherein several great and weighty things are handled: as the nature of prayer, and of obedience to the law, with how far it obliges Christians, and wherein it consists: wherein is also shewed the equally deplorable condition of the Pharisee, or hypocritical and self-righteous man, and of the publicane, or sinner that lives in sin, and in open violation of the divine laws: together with the way and method of God’s free-grace in pardoning penetent sinners; proving that he justifies them by imputing Christs righteousness to them. Written by John Bunian, author of the Pilgrims progress

London: Printed for Jo. Harris, at the Harrow, over against the Church in the Poultry, 1685

$15,500.00

Duodecimo: 14 x 8 cm. [8], 202 p. A4, B-I12, K7 (with the first blank. Lacking final blank).

Printed one year after the appearance of the second part of “The Pilgrim’s Progress” and in the same year that the Bedford magistrates ordered penal laws against nonconformists to be enforced, Bunyan’s “Discourse upon the Pharisee and the Publicane” is a fiery critique of the tyranny of the Church of England and of those among his readers who, like the residents of Vanity Fair and the Pharisee in the parable, prided themselves on superficial religiosity.

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ESTC R3995; Wing (2nd ed., 1994), B5512A; Harrison 34

The First Printed Book on Book Collecting – With the First Catalogue of Manuscripts at Oxford

Bury, Richard de, Bishop of Durham (1287-1345); James, Thomas (1573-1629)
Philobiblon Richardi Dunelmensis sive De amore librorum, et institutione bibliothecæ, tractatus pulcherrimus. Ex collatione cum varijs manuscriptis editio jam secunda; cui accessit appendix de manuscriptis Oxoniensibus. Omnia hæc, opera & studio T.I. Novi Coll. in alma Academia Oxoniensi socij. B.P.N

Oxford: Joseph Barnes, 1599

$40,000.00

Quarto: 17.3 x 12.7 cm. [8], 62, [10] pp. Collation: *4, A-I4 (complete with blank leaf H4)

The first edition to be printed in England of the first published work on bibliophily, the “love of books”. The book was written in 1345 by the English statesman, intellectual, bibliophile and book collector Richard de Bury (Aungerville), Bishop of Durham, whose collection of manuscripts numbered in the hundreds. Bury discusses various aspects of book collecting and the maintenance of a library, as well as the state of learning and scholarly practices of his age.

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Madan, Early Oxford Press, I p.47, no. 8; Pforzheimer 21; ESTC S104430; STC 959

Comets, Conjoined Twins, The Invention of Printing & the Martyrdom of Anne Askew. The Boxbourne Library Copy

Carion, Johannes (1499-1537/8); Melanchthon, Philip (1497-1560); Lynne, Walter (d. 1571)
The thre bokes of cronicles, whyche Iohn Carion (a man syngularly well sene in the mathematycall sciences) gathered wyth great diligence of the beste authours that haue written in Hebrue, Greke or Latine. Whervnto is added an appendix, conteynyng all such notable thynges as be mentyoned in cronicles to haue chaunced in sundry partes of the worlde from the yeare of Christ. 1532. to thys present yeare of. 1550. Gathered by Iohn Funcke of Nurenborough. Whyche was neuer afore prynted in Englysh. Cum priuilegio ad imprimendum solum. [“caused to be translated by Gwalter Lynne.”]

London: [by S. Mierdman] for Gwalter Lynne, dwellynge on Somers Keye, by Byllinges gate. And they are to be solde in Paules church yarde, nexte the great Schole, at the sygne of the sprede Egle, 1550

$10,900.00

Quarto: 19 x 12.7 cm. [8], cclxv, cclxvii-cclxxix, [13] leaves. Collation: *8, A-X8, Z8, Aa-Oo8, Pp4, (lacking blank leaf Nn8)

This is the first edition in English of the work known as “Carion’s Chronicle”, translated by Walter Lynne and dedicated to Edward VI. The work was first conceived of and written by Johann Carion (1499-1537/8), Professor of Mathematics in the University of Frankfurt am Oder, and for a time, court astrologer to Joachim I, Elector of Brandenburg. Carion sent the work to Philip Melanchthon for editing and correction.

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STC 4626

With 23 Woodcuts of the Canterbury Pilgrims

Chaucer, Geoffrey (d. 1400)
The Workes of Geffrey Chaucer, newlie printed, with divers addicions, whiche were never in print before: With the siege and destruccion of the worthy Citee of Thebes, compiled by Jhon Lidgate, Monke of Berie. As in the table more plainly doeth appere.

London: John Kyngston for John Wight, 1561

$68,000.00

Folio: 33 x 22 cm. [14], ccclxxviij leaves. Collation: [fleuron]⁴ [Maltese cross]⁶ A⁴, B-V⁶, 2A-2P⁶, ²Q-T⁶, ²V-X⁸, ²Y-Z⁶, 3A-3T⁶, 3V⁸. Leaves 03/4 reversed. Complete.

There were two series of woodcut illustrations used in 15thand 16thc. editions of the "Canterbury Tales": one by William Caxton, used in his 1483 edition, in 1498 by Wynkyn de Worde, and the 1532 and 1542 editions of the "Works". The second set, modeled on Caxton's, was made for Richard Pynson's 1492 edition of the "Tales". For the second Pynson edition (1526), some of the original 1492 blocks were used while others were re-cut on new blocks.

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Pforzheimer 176; ESTC S107206 (STC 5075); Langland to Wither, 42; Literature: E.P. Hammond, Chaucer, p. 119-122; David Carlson, "Woodcut Illustrations of the Canterbury Tales, 1483-1602", The Library, Vol. s6-19, Issue 1 (1 March, 1997), pages 25-67; David Carlson, "Woodcut Illustrations in Early Printed Editions of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales", in Chaucer Illustrated: Five Hundred Years of The Canterbury Tales in Pictures; Joe Dane, "Press-Variants in John Stow's Chaucer (1561) and the Text of Adam Scriveyn" (with Seth Lerer). Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society 11 (1999): 468-79.

The Scandalous Life of Elizabeth Chudleigh

Chudleigh, Elizabeth (c. 1720-1788)
An Authentic Detail of Particulars relative to the Late Duchess of Kingston.

London: Printed for G. Kearsley, at Johnson’s Head, No. 46, Fleet-Street, 1788

$3,800.00

Octavo: 21 x 13 cm. pp. [ii], ii, 178, [18]. Collation: [A]2, B-Z4, A1. With an added engraved frontispiece of the Duchess, with breasts exposed "as she appeared at the Venetian Ambassador

Duchess of Kingston, granddaughter of the poet Mary Chudleigh (1656-1710), from whom “she seemed to have inherited no notable literary tastes or talents”(Rizzo) Elizabeth was notorious for her sexual escapades, daring, and profligacy. She studiously cultivated this image, referring to herself (in the third person) thus: “She was both wasteful and penurious; the most enormous sums were expended to gratify her love of display, at the same time that she refused to incur some trifling necessary expense in her household….

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ESTC T92902

The First Edition. A Fine Copy in a Contemporary Binding

Chudleigh, Mary Lee, Lady (bap. 1656- d. 1710)
Poems on several occasions. Together with The song of the three children paraphras’d. By the Lady Chudleigh

London: printed by W[illiam]. B[owyer]. for Bernard Lintott at the Middle Temple Gate in Fleetstreet, 1703

$15,000.00

Octavo: 19.5 x 12 cm. [16], 125, [17], 73, [1] pp. Collation: A-O8, P4

Mary Chudleigh was a friend of Elizabeth Thomas and an admirer of Mary Astell, with whom she corresponded and whose ‘Defence of the Female Sex’ she tried to emulate. Dedicated to Queen Anne, her ‘Poems on Several Occasions’ was widely noticed, achieving a second edition in 1709. The poems include a wide range of subjects, from lyrics and satires of the age of Dryden, to philosophical and more contemplative verse in keeping with the solitary and often melancholy life that she led in Devon.

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Foxon p. 121; ESTC t97275; Maslen and Lancaster, Bowyer ledgers, D36

Printed on the Puritan Separatist Press at Amsterdam

Clifton, Richard (ca. 1553-1616)
The Plea for Infants and Elder People, concerning their Baptisme. Or a processe of the passages between M. John Smyth and Richard Clyfton: wherein, first is proved, that the baptising of Infants of beleevers, is an ordinance of God. Secondly, that the rebaptising of such, as have been formerly baptised in the Apostate Churches of Christians, is utterly unlawful

Amsterdam: Gyles Thorp, 1610

$9,600.00

Quarto: 18.5 x 14.5 cm. [20], 226 [2] p. Collation: *-**4, ***2, A-Z4, Aa-Ee4, Ff2

Provenance: Richard Clifton (1642-1664), son of Zachary Clifton (born 1589), and grandson of Richard Clifton, the author of the present work, with ownership inscriptions to front and rear of the volume. Zachary Clifton returned with his family to England in 1651 during the Commonwealth era, and died in 1671.

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STC 5450; ESTC online locates 8 copies: British Library, Cambridge University Trinity College, Lambeth Palace, Bodleian; Yale, Harvard, Union Theological Seminary (NY), American Baptist Samuel Colgate Historical Library (GA.)

Revelation in Puritan New England

Cotton, John (1585–1652)
The Churches resurrection, or The opening of the fift and sixt verses of the 20th. chap. of the Revelation· By that learned and reverend, Iohn Cotton teacher to the Church of Boston in Nevv England, and there corrected by his own hand

London: printed by R[ichard]. O[ulton]. & G[regory]. D[exter]. for Henry Overton, and are to be sold at his shop in Popes-head-Alley, 1642

$4,800.00

Quarto: 18.6 x 14.4 cm. A-D4 (leaf D4 blank and present). [30], [2] p.

“John Cotton was the most important minister of the first generation in America, an Emmanuel Cambridge scholar who from 1612 was vicar of St. Botolph's Boston in Lincolnshire. For more than a decade, Cotton had ceased to observe Church of England ceremonies and was connected with those circles of Puritans emigrating to America. In 1630 those organizing John Winthrop's fleet to New England invited him to preach a sermon at Southampton.

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ESTC R27919; Sabin 17054; Wing C6419

The Protestant Martyrs. With the Ballad of John Careless, Later adapted by Shakespeare in King Lear

Coverdale, Miles (1488-1568)
Certain most godly, fruitful, and comfortable letters of such true saintes and holy martyrs of God, as in the late bloodye persecution here within this realme, gaue their lyues for the defence of Christes holy gospel: written in the tyme of theyr affliction and cruell imprysonment.

London: By Iohn Day, dwelling ouer Aldersgate, beneath Saint Martines, 1564

$16,000.00

Quarto: 18 x 13.5 cm. [8], 46, 49-689, [5] p. Collation: A4, B-C8, D8(-D8), E-I8, K8(-K6), L-Y8 2A-2X8, 2Y8 + [hand]Y4 (Leaves D8 and K6 are canceled, as intended.)

An important collection of writings by English Protestants, many of whom had been martyred, compiled and with a preface by Miles Coverdale. There are letters by Lady Jane Gray (1536/7-1554) (a letter written “to her syster the Ladye Katheryne, immediately before she suffered”), John Bradford (1510?-1555) (including a partial reprint of \"An exhortacion to the carienge of Chrystes crosse\", STC 3480.

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STC 5886

Crashaw’s English Poems

Crashaw, Richard (1612-1649)
Steps to the Temple, The Delights of the Muses and Carmen Deo Nostro. By Ric. Crashaw, sometimes Fellow of Pembroke Hall, and late fellow of St Peters Colledge in Cambridge. The 2nd Edition.

London: In the Savoy, Printed by T.N. for Henry Herringman at the Blew Anchor in the Lower Walk of the New Exchange. 1670

$8,500.00

Octavo: [16], 112, 115-208, [2] p., [1] leaf of plates. Collation: A-O8 (O8 blank and present.) With an added, engraved frontispiece of the temple.

Along with Donne, Herbert and Marvell, Crashaw was one of the most important of the Metaphysical poets. "Compared with one another, Crashaw represents more of Donne's ecstasy, and Herbert more of his reason" (George Williamson). The son of a Puritan clergyman who eventually converted to Catholicism, Crashaw is best known for the intensity of his religious poetry.

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Wing C 6838; Grolier, Wither to Prior # 234

Two Holograph Letters of Joseph Creswell, S.J., with arguments to the Spanish King for the conversion of England & A Second Spanish Armada

Creswell, Joseph, S.J. (1557 – ca. 1623)
[Two documents on paper, in Spanish, signed by the author] Con muchas y evidentes señales ha declarado Dios Nuestro Señor y se[gui]ra declarando cada dia, que es servido reducir el Reino de Ingla[ter]ra otra vez a n[uest]ra S[an]ta Fee, y que aver dilatado esta reduccion, ha sido para hazer la major, disponiendo en este medio asi a los naturales para q la reciban…

1. No place, ? St. Alban 29 March, 1597 And, 2. "en este Collegio" ? St. Alban 1597

$16,000.00

Folio: 31 x 22.5 cm. I. [3] pp. II. [8] pp.

Two manuscript letters, apparently unpublished, by Joseph Creswell, S.J. advising Philip II, King of Spain, on the restoration of Catholicism in England, , apparently written at St. Alban's College, Valladolid, Spain in early 1597. The letters are addressed to an unnamed religious figure, apparently close to the king, who heeds his counsel. These letters are not found in Calendar of State Papers, Spanish (Simancas, Valladolid).

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Defending Cromwell’s Grand State Funeral

CROMWELL, OLIVER (1599-1658). Lawrence, George (bap. 1613-1696)
Peplum Olivarii, Or, A good Prince bewailed by a good people. Represented in a sermon October 13. 1658. Upon the death of Oliver, Late Lord Protector

London: printed by E[dward] M[ottershed], for Samuel Thomson at the Bishops head in Pauls Church-yard, 1658

$3,500.00

Quarto: 18 x 14 cm. [4], 36 pp. A2, B-E4, F2

“One of the surprisingly few sermons on Cromwell’s death to be published. [It] goes to a length in justifying the grand and stately funeral rites, suggesting nervousness that their propriety might be challenged.”(Holberton) The author is the clergyman George Lawrence, who probably served as an army chaplain during the Civil War and knew Cromwell. The sermon is dedicated to Cromwell’s son, Richard Cromwell.

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ESTC R207645 locates 5 copies in the UK and 4 copies in North America. Wing L659

A Method for Teaching the "Deaf-Mute" to Speak & Surveying the physiological bases of human expressive behaviour

DEAF COMMUNITY. MUTENESS. LANGUAGE. PHYSIOGNOMY. Bulwer, John (active 1648-1654)
Philocophus: or, The deafe and dumbe mans friend. Exhibiting the philosophicall verity of that subtile art, which may inable one with an observant eie, to heare what any man speaks by the moving of his lips. Upon the same ground, with the advantage of an historicall exemplification, apparently proving, that a man borne deafe and dumbe, may be taught to heare the sound of words with his eie, & thence learne to speake with his tongue. By I.B. sirnamed the Chirosopher

London: for Humphrey Moseley, and are to be sold at his shop in Pauls Church-yard, 1648

$8,500.00

"Philocophus" was the first English work treating at length the subject of deafness and its accompanying language problems. It was dedicated to two deaf men, the brothers Sir Edward and William Gostwicke, who, Bulwer relates, although proficient in signing, earnestly wanted to learn to speak, accounting their inability to speak their "greatest unhappiness.

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I. Wellcome II, p. 270; ESTC R3977; Wing B5469. II. Norman 340; Wellcome II, p. 270; Krivatsky 1952; ESTC R8806; Wing B5468