Luther & the Protestant Reformation

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A Fine, Large 13th c. "Proto" Paris Bible

BIBLE MANUSCRIPT, with prologues and the Interpretations of Hebrew Names
Decorated manuscript on vellum, in Latin

France (Paris?), early 13th century

$175,000.00

Contents: The books of the Bible and prologues are very close to the standard Paris sequence (f.1), omitting Psalms, and with a capitula list for Genesis; the Interpretations of Hebrew Names in the version from Aaz to Zuzim (f.167), alphabetised to the first two letters; preceded by added notes on the four types of biblical exposition (historical, tropological, anagogical, typological) and the seven rules of theology (f.

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Otto Schäfer's Copy –An Exceptional Set in Contemporary Green Calf –Illustrated with 75 Fine Woodcuts

BIBLE. OLD TESTAMENT IN GERMAN. Luther, Martin (1483-1546), translator
Das Alte Testament Deutsch nach urspringlicher Hebreischer warheit. Mit schöner der schwersten [W]örter ausslegung.

Strasbourg: Johann Knobloch, [?January] 1524, July 1524, March 1525

$85,000.00

Folio: Three volumes bound as one. 30.5 x 20.8 cm. Vol. I: [6], CLI, [1] lvs. Vol. II: [1], CXC, [1] lvs., Vol. III: LXXXVII lvs. Collation: Vol. I: i-vi, A-Z6, Aa6, Bb8 (Bb8 blank and present.) Vol. II: A-Z6, Aa-Ii6 (Ii6 blank and present). Vol III: A-C6, D4, E-P6

A fine set of an early printing of Luther's German Old Testament, profusely illustrated. The first volume of the Old Testament, including the Pentateuch, was first published at Wittenberg by Melchior Lotter, the Younger, for Lucas Cranach and Christian Döring,in mid-1523.

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Comets, Conjoined Twins, The Invention of Printing & the Martyrdom of Anne Askew. The Boxbourne Library Copy

Carion, Johannes (1499-1537/8); Melanchthon, Philip (1497-1560); Lynne, Walter (d. 1571)
The thre bokes of cronicles, whyche Iohn Carion (a man syngularly well sene in the mathematycall sciences) gathered wyth great diligence of the beste authours that haue written in Hebrue, Greke or Latine. Whervnto is added an appendix, conteynyng all such notable thynges as be mentyoned in cronicles to haue chaunced in sundry partes of the worlde from the yeare of Christ. 1532. to thys present yeare of. 1550. Gathered by Iohn Funcke of Nurenborough. Whyche was neuer afore prynted in Englysh. Cum priuilegio ad imprimendum solum. [“caused to be translated by Gwalter Lynne.”]

London: [by S. Mierdman] for Gwalter Lynne, dwellynge on Somers Keye, by Byllinges gate. And they are to be solde in Paules church yarde, nexte the great Schole, at the sygne of the sprede Egle, 1550

$10,900.00

Quarto: 19 x 12.7 cm. [8], cclxv, cclxvii-cclxxix, [13] leaves. Collation: *8, A-X8, Z8, Aa-Oo8, Pp4, (lacking blank leaf Nn8)

This is the first edition in English of the work known as “Carion’s Chronicle”, translated by Walter Lynne and dedicated to Edward VI. The work was first conceived of and written by Johann Carion (1499-1537/8), Professor of Mathematics in the University of Frankfurt am Oder, and for a time, court astrologer to Joachim I, Elector of Brandenburg. Carion sent the work to Philip Melanchthon for editing and correction.

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STC 4626

The Rare 1524 Paris “Praise of Folly”

Erasmus, Desiderius (ca. 1466-1536)
Moriae encomium D. Erasmi Roterodami cu[m] Gerardi Listrii trium linguarum periti commentariis. Praemittuntur Ludus L. Annei Senec[ae], de morte Claudii, cu[m] scholiis Beati Rhenani. Synesius Cyrenen[sis] de Laudibus caluitii. Adduntur Martini Dorpii theologi ad Erasmum epistola et Erasmi ad eandem responsio apologetica.

Paris: Jodocus Badius Ascensius, 1524

$12,500.00

Quarto: 19.8 x 14.5 cm. CXX leaves. Collation: a-p8

The rare 1524 Parisian “Praise of Folly”, printed by Erasmus’ friend, the scholar-printer Badius Ascensius, who printed the fourth edition in 1512. This edition differs markedly from the 1512 edition and contains all of the supplementary texts found in the Froben editions, including the dedicatory letter to Thomas More, whose name Erasmus plays upon cleverly in the title of the work; and the letter to Martin Dorp in which Erasmus explains his motives for writing the “Moria”: “My aim in the ‘Folly’ was exactly the same as in my other works.

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Vander Haeghen I, 123; Kossmann 979; Bibl. Belgica E 866; (Not in Bezzel, De Reuck, or BM STC French); Renouard, Badius II, 424; Adams E 397. Inventaire chronologique des editions Parisiennes du XVIe siecle III, no. 669; Renouard, Imprimeurs Parisiens du XVIe siècle II, no. 539

“Friends hold all things in common”

Erasmus, Desiderius (ca. 1466-1536)
Chiliades Adagiorvm: Opvs Integrum Et Perfectum D. Erasmi Roterodami, locupletatum & recognitum, quem admodum in extremis conatibus autori uisum est ; Acceßit indicibus antiquis in hac impreßione nouus & tertius ...

Cologne: Ex officina Ioannis Gymnici, 1540

$6,500.00

Folio: 31.2 x 20 cm. [88], 3-874, [1] pp. A-d6, e8, f-g6, A-Z6, Aa-Zz6, Aaa-Zzz6, Aaaa-Dddd6 (last leaf is blank.)

A very rare Cologne edition of Erasmus’ beloved and extraordinarily influential “Adages”, first conceived as a collection of proverbial sayings drawn from the Latin authors of antiquity elucidated for the use of those who aspired to write an elegant Latin style. In its first incarnation, the “Adagia” consisted of about eight hundred proverbs. The present version, Erasmus' "Adagia Chiliades" (“Thousands of Adages”) is more than just a vastly expanded edition of that first enterprise: "

A glance at its composition reveals that the ‘Adagia Chiliades’ was in fact -as well as in name- a new book, and that Greek scholarship was largely responsible for the difference.

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Van der Haeghen I, 4; Bezzel, 83; VD16 E 1944

The 1515 Froben “Praise of Folly”

Erasmus, Desiderius (ca. 1466-1536): Piccolomini, Aeneas Sylvius (Pope Pius II) (1405-1464); Wimpfeling, Jakob (1450-1528): Lactantius, Lucius Caecilius Firmianus (ca. 240 – ca. 320): Lactantius, Lucius Caecilius Firmianus (ca. 240 – ca. 320)
[Bound with:] Piccolomini, Aeneas Sylvius (Pope Pius II) (1405-1464); Wimpfeling, Jakob (1450-1528) Germania Enee Silvii: in qua candide lector continentur : gravamina germanice nationis : confutatio eorundem cum replicis ; de concilio Constantiensi & Basiliensi ; describuntur hic urbes, civitates, ecclesie, episcopatus, abbacie, principatus & principatus & nobilissime familie Germanorum… De concordatis principum. De officio pape & suis officialibus. De veritate Christiane religionis Strasbourg: Excusum per Renatu[m] Beck in aedibus zum Thiergarten, 21 June 1515 [Bound with:] Lactantius, Lucius Caecilius Firmianus (ca. 240 – ca. 320) Lepida Lactantij Firmiani opera accurate græco adiuncto castigata: Eiusdem Nephytomon: Carmina de Phoenice. & Christi Resurrectione. Io. Chry. de Eucharistia sermo. Lau. Val. sermo. Phil. ad theo. Adhortatio. Paris: Jean Petit, In vico Sancti Iacobi, 1513

Basel: and Strasbourg: and Paris: Io. Froben, and Excusum per Renatu[m] Beck in aedibus zum Thiergarten, and Jean Petit, In vico Sancti Iacobi, 1515 and 1515 and 1513

$20,500.00

Large Quarto: 3 works bound in one volume: I. Piccolomini: i-iv, A-B4, C8, D-E4, F8, G-H4, I8, K-L4, M8, N-O4, P6. II. Lactantius: A6, B4, a-z8/4, A-D8/4, E6, F-N8/4, O6, P4. III. “Praise of Folly”: a-h4, a-z4, A-B4, C6

This edition includes the original dedicatory letter to Thomas More, whose name Erasmus plays upon cleverly in the title of the work; and the letter to Martin Dorp in which Erasmus explains his motives for writing the “Moria”: “My aim in the ‘Folly’ was exactly the same as in my other works. Only the presentation was different. In the ‘Enchiridion’ I simply outlined the pattern of a Christian life.

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I. “Germania”: BM STC German p. 701 = Proctor 10307. Not in Adams. Panzer VI.75.410. Ritter 1878. Muller, Bibliographie Strasbourgeoise II, 228 no. 26. Schmidt (Beck) 21. II. Lactantius: Adams L-14; BSB-Ink L-13; HC 9819; Moreau, Inventaire chronologique II 637. III. “Praise of Folly”: Vander Haeghen I, 122; Kossmann 967; Bezzel 1304; Not in De Reuck; BM STC German p. 282; Adams E 392; VD, 16E 3184

“My yoke is sweet and my burden light.” A Vernacular Translation of Erasmus’ Annotation on Mathew 11:29-30

Erasmus, Desiderius (ca.1466-1536)
Herr Erasmus von Ro||terdam/ verteutschte außlegung/|| über das/ go[e]ttlich tro[e]stlich wort || vnsers lieben Herrñ vnnd selig=||machers Christi/ Nement auff || euch mein Joch/ vnd ler=||nent von mir.

[Mainz: Johann Schöffer], 1521

$5,200.00

Quarto: [8] pp. Collation: AA4

A German translation of Erasmus’ annotation on Mathew 11:29 (taken from his “In Novum Testamentum annotationes”) in which Erasmus differentiates between the divine order and human positive law. He laments that people ignore the commands of God and follow human law instead: ‘Christ’s law is inviting and easy, but it becomes onerous and difficult through the addition of human prescriptions and dogmas.

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Bezzel 1228; VD16 E 3106

A Painter turned Pamphleteer

Greiffenberger, Hans (fl. 1524)
Ein trostliche ermanung den angefocht(e)n gewissen vo(n) wegen gethoner sünd, wye un(d) wamitt Sye getröst werdenn, den Sathan, sich nit erschrecken lassenn.

Augsburg: M. Ramminger, 1524

$4,500.00

Quarto: 20.5 x 15.5 cm. [12] p. Collation: A6

Hans Greiffenberger was a Nuremberg painter who ran afoul of the authorities for both his art and for his subversive religious activism. In October 1524 he was investigated on the charge of creating an unsuitable and offensive painting and "because he seduces the people to a new sect." The artwork was described as "a shameful painting that he made against papal sanctity."

While he lacked the literary skills of Hans Sachs, Greiffenberger's works had a similar immediacy.

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VD 16, G 3155; Kuczynski 939

Henry VIII's "Assertion of the Seven Sacraments against Martin Luther"

Henry VIII, King (1491-1547)
Assertio septem sacramentorum adversus Martinum Lutherum

Lyon: Guillaume Rouillé, 1561

$6,500.00

Quarto: 21 x 15.5 cm. xxxxvj, 195, [1] p. Collation: bb-nn, a-z, A4, B2

Written in 1521 in response to Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church” -the reformer’s radical exposition of the Protestant faith and attack on the papacy- Henry VIII’s “Defense of the Seven Sacraments” won for its author the coveted title of “Defensor Fidei” (Defender of the Faith) from Pope Leo X. Coming as it did from such a powerful Christian prince, Luther was forced to respond to Henry’s work, which he did with more than his usual severity, insulting the king and challenging his theological points.

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Adams H 250

An Empty Bladder: Mocking Leo X’s Bull

Hutten, Ulrich von (1488-1523)
Dialogi novi, perquam festivi. Bulla, vel Bullicida. Monitor primus. Monitor secundus. Praedones.

[Strasbourg: Johann Schott], 1521

$6,500.00

Quarto: 21.5 x 15.5 cm. 37, [1] lvs. (final leaf blank). Collation: A-H4, I6 (I6 blank and present)

Sole edition of these new satiric dialogues. In the “Bull or Bull Killer”, Hutten satirizes Leo X’s bull “Exsurge Domine”, which threatened Luther and his followers with excommunication.

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VD 16, H 6311; Benzing, Hutten; 161; Panzer IX, 456, 2; Hohenemser 2756; Oldenbourg, Baldung Grien L 182

Syphilis, Fortune, & Roman Decadence

Hutten, Ulrich von (1488-1523)
Dialogi. Fortuna. Febris prima. Febris secunda. Trias Romana. Inspicientes.

Mainz: Johann Schöffer, 1520

$5,900.00

Quarto: 20 x 14.5 cm. [144] p. Collation: A-B4, C6, D-N4, O6, P-R4.

First edition of this important collection. Only the first “Fever” poem had appeared previously (in 1519). The anonymous German satire "Trias Romana"(1519) is a different work than Hutten's satire of the same name.

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VD 16, H 6346; Benzing, Hutten 122; Fairfax Murray 215

The Immaculate Virgin

Luther, Martin (1483-1546)
Ayn Sermon am tag unser Frawen Liechtmeß gethon zuo Witemberg durch Doctor Marthin Luther. Im Jar MDXXIII.

Augsburg: Melchior Ramminger, 1523

$4,500.00

Quarto: 20 x 15 cm. [8] pp. Collation A4

A sermon for Lichtmeß (Candlemas), the feast of the presentation of the infant Jesus in the temple and the purification of Mary (February 2). Jesus takes as his text Luke 2:22-39.

For the complexities of Luther’s evolving Mariology, see Thomas O'Meara, Mary in Protestant and Catholic Theology (1966). “Luther's attitude toward the theology of Mary and toward the devotion which a Christian should have to the Mother of God is a small-scale representation of his entire religious accomplishment.

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Benzing 1746; VD16 L-6084

The Antichrist Usurps the Name of the Church

Luther, Martin (1483-1546)
Ad Librum Eximii Magistri Nostri Ambrosii Catharini Defensoris Silvestri Prieratis Acerrimi Responsio Martini Lutheri. Wittembergae, Mense Aprili. Cum exposita Visione Danielis, viii. De Antichristo.

Wittenberg: [Melchoir Lotter], 1521

$4,500.00

Quarto: 21 x 15.5 cm. a-r4 (lacking final blank leaf r4) 115 pp.

Luther's response to Ambrosius Catharinus Politus' (1487-1552) "Defense of the True Catholic and Apostolic Faith and Doctrine against the Disease-spreading Dogma of Martin Luther" (Florence, 1520). In his defense of papal supremacy, Catharinus also defends the opinions of Sylvester Mazolinus de Prierio (Prierius, d. 1523), Pope Leo X's theologian and the first man to censor Luther's works.

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Benzing 880; Adams L 1841; Kessler # 271; BM STC German p. 540; Pegg, Bibliotheca 911; VD 16, l 3706; Schrodt & Vogelstein 163; Kuczynski 1417

Against the Radical Preacher Thomas Münzer. Luther warns of Open Rebellion on the Eve of the Peasants’ War

Luther, Martin (1483-1546)
Eyn Brieff an die Fürsten zu Sachsen von dem auffrurischen Geyst. Wittenberg

Wittenberg: Cranach and Döring, 1524

$5,500.00

Quarto: 21 x 15 cm. [20] pp. A4, B2, C4

First edition of Luther’s response to the growing danger posed by the radical preacher Thomas Münzer, who was ultimately executed the following year for leading the violent, open revolt that came to be known as the Peasants’ War.

In 1523, Thomas Münzer, formerly the leader of the radical “Zwickau Prophets” began to radicalize the area of Allstedt, where he was then pastor, preaching that the ungodly were to be eliminated and the elect would establish a kingdom of Christ on earth and threatening the political rulers of the area with rebellion.

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Benzing 1927; Kessler 553; Title border: Luther, “Titeleinfassungen der Reformationszeit”, 43c

Whether Those Who Die Without Faith Can Be Saved

Luther, Martin (1483-1546)
Eyn Sendbriff uber die Frage. Ob auch yemant on glauben verstorben selig werden muge. An Er Hanssen von Rechenberg zur Freystadt.

[Erfurt: Stürmer], 1523

$4,500.00

Quarto: 20 x 14.5 cm. [8] pp. A4

Luther wrote this letter in August 1522 to Hans von Rechenberg, a strong supporter of the Reformation and a man who distinguished himself in battle against the Turks. There is no evidence that Luther knew von Rechenberg personally but the question that Luther addresses in the letter, whether a person who dies without faith may be saved, seems to have been one of personal concern to the addressee.

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Benzing 1270

“To the Goat at Leipzig”

Luther, Martin (1483-1546)
An den Bock zu Leyptzck.

Wittenberg: [Melchior Lotter the younger], 1521

$5,600.00

Quarto: 20.5 x 14.5 cm. [8] pp. A4

“In December 1520 Jerome Emser renewed his attack on Luther with a lengthy treatise written against Luther’s famous address ‘To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation’(August 1520) entitled ‘Against the Un-Christian Book of the Augustinian Martin Luther.’ It prompted an immediate reply from Luther.

“Luther’s ‘To the Goat in Leipzig’ is the first of a series of four treatises that Luther wrote against Emser.

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Benzing 827; See Concordia, Luther’s Works, Vol 39. “To the Goat at Leipzig”; WA 7, 262-265

The Magnificat: Luther’s Evolving Vision of the Virgin Mary

Luther, Martin (1483-1546)
Das Magnificat Vorteutscht und außgelegt durch D. Martinum Luther Aug. Vuittenberg.

Wittenberg: Melchior Lotter, 1521

$5,600.00

Quarto: [88] pp. a-l4

Luther wrote his “The Magnificat Translated into German and Explained” in two parts, the first composed before his appearance at the Diet of Worms and the second part while he was in hiding in the Wartburg in May and June 1521. Given that Luther’s vision of the church and of Mary’s nature and place within Christianity were evolving (and were to evolve much further over time), and the fact that Luther left the Diet a changed man living in changed circumstances, it is no wonder that Luther’s exposition of the Magnificat has been the subject of numerous conflicting interpretations.

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VD16 L-5453; Benzing Luther 855; Kuczynski 1431

Luther on Celibacy & Marriage

Luther, Martin (1483-1546)
Das siebe(n)d Capitel S. Pauli zu den Chorinthern Ausgelegt.

Wittenberg: [Cranach and Döring], 1523

$4,800.00

Quarto: 19.8 x 14.7 cm. [38] pp. A-K4 (lacks final blank)

But if they do not have self-control, they should marry, for it is better to marry than to burn with desire.”-1 Corinthians 7:9

First edition of Luther’s important sermon on the problem of celibacy. Luther argued that sexual desire was inescapable for all but a handful, so it should be channeled into marriage. Vows of celibacy should be rendered void, and monasteries and convents should be closed or much reduced in size.

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Benzing 1674; Title page border: Luther, TE 58. Zimmerman attributes the border to Lucas Cranach, Dodgson to Hans Cranach.

Luther Recounts his Youthful Pilgrimage to Rome

Luther, Martin (1483-1546)
Der Hundert vnd Siebenzehend Psalm.

Wittenberg: Georg Rhau, 1530

$4,800.00

Quarto: 19 x 13.4 cm. [34] lvs. Collation: A-G4, H2, I4 (lacks blank I4)

“Luther’s commentary on Psalm 117, printed by George Rhau in October 1530, is a revision of an earlier version printed at the Coburg earlier in 1530. It is dedicated to Hans von Sternberg, who had taken a pilgrimage to the Holy Land and had told Luther about it. The German text includes Luther's German translation of Psalm 117 from the Hebrew O.T.

“This commentary is Luther’s critique of medieval spirituality, and includes an account of his own pilgrimage to Rome.

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Benzing 2892

Melanchthon Assumes Luther’s Mantle & Protests the Council of Trent

Melanchthon, Philip. (1497-1560)
Ursache Warumb die gemainde und Kirchen Christi ungegrünten Concilien nit sollen stadt geben, sonder bey der Bibel, das ist bey dem rainen Wort Gottes, festhalten und bleyben, auss Latein Ph. Mel. verdeutschet durch Justum Jonam Doct.

Regenspurg: Hans Khol, 1553

$3,500.00

Quarto: 20.5 x 15 cm. [88] pp. A-L4

This is the German-language edition, translated by Justus Jonas the Elder, of Melanchthon’s “Causae quare et amplexae sint, et retinendam ducant doctrinam, quam profitentur, ecclesiae, quae Confessionem Augustae exhibitam imperatori sequuntur & quare iniquis iudicibus, collectis in synodo Tridentina, ut vocant, non sit adsentiendum”(1546), a work in which he defends the Augsburg Confession and condemns the newly convened Council of Trent.

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VD 16 M 2656 (four copies only); Hartfelder p. 609, no. 517; Knaake 637; Strobel 273