The English Reformation

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The City of God

Augustine, Saint, of Hippo (354-430 AD); Vives, Juan Luis (1492-1540); Healy, John [translator] (d. 1610)
Saint Augustine, Of the citie of God : with the learned comments of Io. Lodouicus Viues. Englished first by J. H. and now in this second edition compared with the Latine originall, and in very many places corrected and amended.

London: Printed by G. Eld and M. Flesher, 1620

$8,500.00

Folio: 32.3 x 21.5 cm. ¶4, A-Z6, Aa-Zz6, Aaa-Zzz6, Aaaa-Dddd6 (lacks blank ¶1).

This second edition was revised by William Crashaw (1572-1626), father of the poet Richard Crashaw, and includes the commentary of Juan Luis Vives (first published in Basle, 1522), which Vives wrote at the suggestion of Erasmus.

"Fifteen years after Augustine wrote the Confessions, at a time when he was bringing to a close (and invoking government power to do so) his long struggle with the Donatists but before he had worked himself up to action against the Pelagians, the Roman world was shaken by news of a military action in Italy.

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STC 917; Estelrich 119. Pforzheimer 19

One of the First Attempts to Write a “Protestant” History of the English Church

Bale, John (1495-1563)
The first two partes of the Actes, or vnchast examples of the Englysh votaryes, gathered out of their owne legendes and chronycles by Iohan Bale, and dedycated to our most redoubted soueraigne kynge Edward the syxte.

London: [S. Mierdman] for A Vele and [S. Mierdman], for Iohan Bale, 1550 and 1551

$15,000.00

Octavo: 15.4 x 9.5 cm. [4], 79 lvs; cxx, [4] lvs. Collation: I. *4, A-K8 (with blank K8 present); II. A-P8, Q4

This book consists of two volumes, the first (STC 1273) printed by S. Mierdman for A. Vele, the second (STC 1273.5) by Mierdman for John Bale. As bound, the first four leaves of STC 1273.5, consisting of a general title page ("The first two partes of the Actes..") and the dedicatory epistle, precede the whole of STC 1273, which comprises the first book. The bulk of STC 1273.5 (beginning "The Second Part…" and concluding with the errata) is bound last, as intended by the printer.

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ESTC 100594. Comprises STC 1273 and 1273.5; Davies, “A Bibliography of John Bale”, Number 23 (b) and (c).

Bunyan’s Evolving Doctrine of Justification & An Attack on the Church of England - The First Edition - Complete With the Engraved frontispiece

Bunyan, John (1628-1688)
A discourse upon the Pharisee and the publicane. Wherein several great and weighty things are handled: as the nature of prayer, and of obedience to the law, with how far it obliges Christians, and wherein it consists: wherein is also shewed the equally deplorable condition of the Pharisee, or hypocritical and self-righteous man, and of the publicane, or sinner that lives in sin, and in open violation of the divine laws: together with the way and method of God’s free-grace in pardoning penetent sinners; proving that he justifies them by imputing Christs righteousness to them. Written by John Bunian, author of the Pilgrims progress

London: Printed for Jo. Harris, at the Harrow, over against the Church in the Poultry, 1685

$15,500.00

Duodecimo: 14 x 8 cm. [8], 202 p. A4, B-I12, K7 (with the first blank. Lacking final blank).

Printed one year after the appearance of the second part of “The Pilgrim’s Progress” and in the same year that the Bedford magistrates ordered penal laws against nonconformists to be enforced, Bunyan’s “Discourse upon the Pharisee and the Publicane” is a fiery critique of the tyranny of the Church of England and of those among his readers who, like the residents of Vanity Fair and the Pharisee in the parable, prided themselves on superficial religiosity.

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ESTC R3995; Wing (2nd ed., 1994), B5512A; Harrison 34

The Protestant Martyrs. With the Ballad of John Careless, Later adapted by Shakespeare in King Lear

Coverdale, Miles (1488-1568)
Certain most godly, fruitful, and comfortable letters of such true saintes and holy martyrs of God, as in the late bloodye persecution here within this realme, gaue their lyues for the defence of Christes holy gospel: written in the tyme of theyr affliction and cruell imprysonment.

London: By Iohn Day, dwelling ouer Aldersgate, beneath Saint Martines, 1564

$16,000.00

Quarto: 18 x 13.5 cm. [8], 46, 49-689, [5] p. Collation: A4, B-C8, D8(-D8), E-I8, K8(-K6), L-Y8 2A-2X8, 2Y8 + [hand]Y4 (Leaves D8 and K6 are canceled, as intended.)

An important collection of writings by English Protestants, many of whom had been martyred, compiled and with a preface by Miles Coverdale. There are letters by Lady Jane Gray (1536/7-1554) (a letter written “to her syster the Ladye Katheryne, immediately before she suffered”), John Bradford (1510?-1555) (including a partial reprint of \"An exhortacion to the carienge of Chrystes crosse\", STC 3480.

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STC 5886

“No man is an Island”

Donne, John (1573-1631)
Devotions vpon emergent occasions, and seuerall steps in my sicknes: digested into 1. Meditations vpon our humane condition. 2. Expostulations, and debatements with God. 3. Prayers, vpon the seuerall occasions, to him. By Iohn Donne, Deane of S. Pauls, London. The third edition.

London: Printed [by Augustine Mathewes] for Thomas Iones, and are to be sold at the signe of the Black Rauen in the Strand, 1627

$20,000.00

Duodecimo: 13.8 x 8.4 cm. [8], 589, [1] p. A-Z12 (lacks blank A1); Aa-Bb12

“[The ‘Devotions’] present a more vivid and intimate picture of Donne than anything else written by himself or others.” –Sparrow

“Donne’s ‘Devotions’ is the source of the author’s famous meditation on the interconnectedness of all human lives: ‘No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main;… any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind.

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Keynes, G. Donne (4th ed.), 38; STC 7035a; ESTC S114971; Grolier/Donne 20 (this copy)

First Edition of Queen Elizabeth’s Visitation Articles

ELIZABETH I, Queen of England (1533-1603)
Articles to be enquyred in the visitation, in the fyrst yeare of the raygne of our moost drad soueraygne Lady, Elizabeth by the grace of God, of Englande Fraunce, and Irelande, Quene, defender of the fayth. &c. Anno 1559

London: Imprinted… in Povles Churcheyarde by Richard Iugge and Iohn Cavvood, Printers to the Quenes Maiestie, 1559

$22,000.00

Quarto: 18 x 13 cm. [14] pp. Collation: A-B4 (lacking blank leaf B4)

With the signature of the 16th c. book collector Humphrey Dyson (1582-1633) at the foot of the title page. The bookplate of Albert Ehrman, with his motto “Pro Viribus Summis Contendo” is affixed to the front pastedown. This was lot 270 in the 1978 sale of Ehrman’s library. Very rare. ESTC locates 4 copies in the U.S.: Folger, Huntington, Harvard, Yale.

First edition of the first visitation articles established for the reformed church after Elizabeth’s accession.

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STC 10118

England's Descent into Tyranny

Elyot, Thomas, Sir (1490?-1546)
The image of gouernaunce compiled of the actes and sentences notable, of the most noble emperour Alexandre Seuerus, late translated out of Greke into Englishe, by sir Thomas Elyote knyght, in the fauour of nobilitee

London: Imprinted in the house of Thomas Berthelette, 1549

$16,000.00

Octavo: 14 x 9.5 cm. [11], 167 [i.e. 174], [3] lvs. A-Z8, Aa4

The amusing, manuscript poem on the final leaf reads:

This booke is I knowe not wose [whose]

wherefore he may go wipe

his nose yffe he haue the pose

"The last of Elyot’s great works, 'The Image of Governance', a life of the Roman Emperor Alexander Severus, is far from being a straightforward life of an ideal emperor. The 'Image' is actually a complex, bitter, and at times savagely satirical rumination on princely power and its perversions, probably prompted at least in part by the fall of Elyot’s patron and friend Thomas Cromwell.

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ESTC S111496; STC (2nd ed.), 7666

Henry VIII's "Assertion of the Seven Sacraments against Martin Luther"

Henry VIII, King (1491-1547)
Assertio septem sacramentorum adversus Martinum Lutherum

Lyon: Guillaume Rouillé, 1561

$6,500.00

Quarto: 21 x 15.5 cm. xxxxvj, 195, [1] p. Collation: bb-nn, a-z, A4, B2

Written in 1521 in response to Martin Luther’s “The Babylonian Captivity of the Church” -the reformer’s radical exposition of the Protestant faith and attack on the papacy- Henry VIII’s “Defense of the Seven Sacraments” won for its author the coveted title of “Defensor Fidei” (Defender of the Faith) from Pope Leo X. Coming as it did from such a powerful Christian prince, Luther was forced to respond to Henry’s work, which he did with more than his usual severity, insulting the king and challenging his theological points.

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Adams H 250

“We Demand that the Doctrine we Confess be properly Heard and Tested against Holy Scripture.” Henry VIII Defies Pope Paul III

Henry VIII, King of England (1491-1547)
Schrifft, an Keiserliche Maiestat, an alle andere Christliche K'nige und Potentaten, inn welcher der k'nig ursach anzeigt, warumb er gen Vincentz zum Concilio (welchs mit falschen titel, general genent) nich komen sey, Und wie fehrlich auch den andern allen sey, welche das Evangelium Christi angenomen, de zu erscheinen, Aus dem Latin verdeudtscht durch Justum Jonam.

Wittenberg: Joseph Klug, 1539

$4,800.00

Quarto: 19 x 14.5 cm. 10 leaves. A4, B2, C4 (with the final blank leaf present)

This is Justus Jonas' (1493-1555) German translation of Henry VIII's account of why he did not attend the Council of Vicenza. The first edition, " Ad Carolum Cesarem Augustum epistola" was published at London in 1538. An English translation followed soon after. This is an extremely rare work in any edition. Only a single copy of the English edition is held in the United States (Folger).

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Schrodt & Vogelstein 95; Kuczynski 1000; Pegg 1353; Schaaber 160

An Extraordinary Copy in a Contemporary English Binding, with Contemporary English Provenance

More, Sir Thomas (1478-1535); Erasmus, Desiderius (1466?-1536)
De optimo reip. statu deque nova insula Utopia [with:] Epigrammata… Thomae Mori [with:] Epigrammata Des. Erasmi Roterodami

Basel: Johann Froben, March 1518

$135,000.00

Quarto: 22 x 15.5 cm. Three parts in one volume: 355 (i.e. 359), [1] p. Collation: I. a-s4, t-u6. II. x-z4, A-I4, K6. III. L-T4, V6

"Utopia" was first published at Louvain in 1516, overseen by Pieter Gillies, its dedicatee; it was reprinted at Paris in 1517. Erasmus was then responsible for arranging publication of two editions in 1518 (March and December) by 'his' printer at Basel, Johann Froben, for which More revised his text. More's epigrams, published here for the first time, include the stinging verses on his fellow humanist, Germanius de Brie, which, after bitter exchanges between the two men, More would excise from the next edition printed in 1520.

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Adams M-1756; Fairfax Murray German 304 (4th edition); Gibson More 3; Hollstein XIV, p.20; PMM 47 (1516 edition).

The Souls in Purgatory Speak - The Bradley Martin Copy

More, Sir Thomas, Saint (1478-1535)
The Supplycacyon of soulys. Made by syr Thomas More knight councellour to our souerayn lorde the Kynge and chauncellour of hys Duchy of Lancaster. Agaynst the supplycacyon of beggars

London: printed by William Rastell, 1529

$35,000.00

Folio: 27 x 19 cm. xliiii leaves. Collation: A-L4

First edition of Thomas More's reply to Simon Finch's "Supplication for the Beggars." Fish represented the clergy as "thieves," responsible for the distress of the poor; he denies the existence of Purgatory and, appealing to Henry VIII in the voice of the English beggars, calls for the dissolution of the monasteries. More counters each of Fish's arguments, and using Fish's own literary device against him, has the very souls in Purgatory "supplicate" the living for the continuance of the prayers offered by the clergy for their release.

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ESTC S123347; STC (2nd ed.), 18093; Gibson More 70

A Bold Attempt to put Mary Queen of Scots on the English Throne: The Northern Rising of 1569

Norton, Thomas (1532-1584)
To the Quenes Maiesties poore deceyued Subiectes of the North Countrey, drawen into rebellion by the Earles of Northumberland and Westmerland. Written by Thomas Norton. Seen and allowed according to the Quenes iniunctions

London: Henrie Bynneman for Lucas Harrison, 1569

$8,500.00

Octavo: 13.5 x 9.8 cm. [56] pp. Collation: A-G4

The aim of the uprising, led by the Earls of Westmorland and Northumberland, was to depose Elizabeth I and crown Mary, Queen of Scots as queen. The rebels and their supporters were by and large English Catholics, frustrated and angry over the suppression of their religion by the Protestant regime. The rebels found justification for their treason in the belief and assertion that Elizabeth was a bastard (Henry VIII’s marriage to Anne Boleyn being largely considered by Catholics to have been illegitimate) and therefore had no claim to the throne.

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STC 18680

In Defence of the Scottish Presbyterians. Printed at Edinburgh by Robert Waldegrave

Penry, John (1559-1593)
A Briefe Discovery of the Untruthes and Slanders (Against the True Government of the Church of Christ) contained in a sermon, preached the 8. [sic] of Februarie 1588. by D. Bancroft, and since that time, set forth in print, with additions by the said authour. This short ansvver may serue for the clearing of the truth, vntill a larger confutation of the sermon be published.

Edinburgh: Robert Waldegrave, 1590

$4,800.00

Quarto: 7 x 5 in. [8], 56 pp. Collation: A-H4 (lacking preliminary blank A1).

In this tract, the Puritan martyr John Penry defends the Scottish Presbyterians against accusations of disloyalty made by Richard Bancroft, future Archbishop of Canterbury. The book was published anonymously in Edinburgh by Robert Waldegrave (c.1554–1603/4), who had published Penry’s earlier works on a series of secret presses in England. Waldegrave and Penry both fled England in 1589 to escape persecution and arrest.

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ESTC S114383; STC (2nd ed.), 19603

A 16th c. Compilaton of Important English Recusant Texts

RECUSANTS. JESUITS. Gibbons, John (1544-1589); Fenn, John (1544-1589), editors. Allen, William, Cardinal (1532-1594); Parsons (or Persons), Robert, S.J. (1546-1610); Campion, Edmund, Saint (1540-1581); Elizabeth I, Queen of England (1533-1603)
Concertatio ecclesiae Catholicæ in Anglia adversus Caluinopapistas et Puritanos, a paucis annis singulari studio quorundam hominum doctrina & sanctitate illustrium renouata. Operis totius seriem, eius argumentum post epistolam dedicatoriam edocebit.

Trier: Apud Emondum Hatotum, 1583

$2,800.00

A collection of texts by prominent English Catholics, compiled and edited by John Gibbons and John Fenn (though often erroneously attributed to John Bridgewater.) Among the texts are Edmund Campion's "Rationes Decem", Cardinal William Allen's "Apologia pro sacerdotibus Societatis Iesu", Robert Parsons' "De Persecutione Anglicana", and the anonymous account of the capture, torture, trial, and execution of Edmund Campion and his companions Ralph Sherwin and Alexander Briant.

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Allison & Rogers, English Counter-Reformation, Vol. 1, no. 524; De Backer-Sommervogel, Vol. III, col. 1403, no. 1; Adams G262 and E141; Shaaber G262 and A239; VD16 ZV 22415; Milward, Religious controversies of the Elizabethan age, 251; Haile, Elizabethan Cardinal, 1914, p. 376

The First Printing of Two Attacks on Mary, Queen of Scots

STUART, MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS (1542-1587). Buchanan, George (1506-1582)
De Maria Scotorum Regina, totaque eius contra Regem coniuratione, fÏdo cum Bothuelio adulterio, nefaria in maritum crudelitate & rabie, horrendo insuper & deterrimo eiusdem parricidio: plena, & tragica planè historia.

N.p. but London: John Day, no date but 1571

$7,500.00

Octavo: 14 x 8.5 cm (2), 144, (4) pp. Collation: A-Q4

FIRST EDITION of this famous denunciation of Mary, Queen of Scots, by the eminent scholar who had at one time been her tutor and ardent admirer. Buchanan's loyalty ended with the murder of Mary's cousin and husband Lord Darnley, and her hasty marriage to the Earl of Bothwell; he testified at her trial in London, where the notorious "casket letters" were produced as implicating Mary in Darnley's murder.

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STC 3978; Scott, Mary Queen of Scots, 75; CBEL I, 2442

Reinstituting English Catholicism under Mary Tudor

Watson, Thomas (1513-84)
Holsome and catholyke doctryne concernynge the seuen Sacramentes of Chrystes Church, expedient to be knowen of al men, sette forth in maner of shorte sermons to bee made to the people, by the reuerende father in God, Thomas bishoppe of Lincolne. anno. 1558. Mense Februarij.

London: in ædibus Roberti Caly, typographi, [really J. Kingston, Feb. 1558

$8,500.00

Quarto: 18.1 x 13.2 cm. [ ]2, A-X8

An interesting, pirated edition of these thirty sermons by Thomas Watson, Bishop of Lincoln from 1556-58. Robert Caly printed the true first edition in February 1558.

Thomas Watson, an ardent catholic and disciple of Stephen Gardiner, bishop of Winchester, resisted and preached against Protestant reforms during the protectorate of Edward VI. He narrowly avoided prosecution for treason and, as Gardiner’s chaplain, was imprisoned with him in the Fleet from 1550-1551.

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STC 25113

Defining the Nature and Form of the English Church

Whitgift, John, Archbishop of Canterbury (1530?-1604)
The Defense of the Aunsvvere to the Admonition, against the Replie of T.C. By Iohn VVhitgift Doctor of Diuinitie. In the beginning are added these. 4. tables. 1 Of dangerous doctrines in the replie. 2 Of falsifications and vntruthes. 3 Of matters handled at large. 4 A table generall.

London: Henry Binneman, for Humfrey Toye, 1574

$4,200.00

Folio: 27.1 x 18.9 cm. [24], 812, [12] p. a4, b8, A-Z6, Aa-Zz6, Aaa-Xxx6, Yyy4, Aaaa6

SECOND EDITION, printed in the year of the first, of the future Archbishop of Canterbury's reply to Thomas Cartwright's defence against Whitgift's “An Answere to a Certen Libel”, 1572.

“The ‘Admonition to the Parliament’(1572), an appeal to the public in the guise of

a letter to parliament, was the most outspoken protestant criticism of the Elizabethan settlement to appear by that date, and divided the puritans themselves.

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STC (2nd ed.), 25430.5